Control of sleep and wakefulness.

@article{Brown2012ControlOS,
  title={Control of sleep and wakefulness.},
  author={Ritchie E. Brown and Radhika Basheer and James Timothy McKenna and Robert E. Strecker and Robert W. McCarley},
  journal={Physiological reviews},
  year={2012},
  volume={92 3},
  pages={
          1087-187
        }
}
This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the… 
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