Control of gene expression by a natural metabolite-responsive ribozyme

@article{Winkler2004ControlOG,
  title={Control of gene expression by a natural metabolite-responsive ribozyme},
  author={Wade C. Winkler and Ali Nahvi and Adam Roth and Jennifer A. Collins and Ronald R. Breaker},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={428},
  pages={281-286}
}
Most biological catalysts are made of protein; however, eight classes of natural ribozymes have been discovered that catalyse fundamental biochemical reactions. The central functions of ribozymes in modern organisms support the hypothesis that life passed through an ‘RNA world’ before the emergence of proteins and DNA. We have identified a new class of ribozymes that cleaves the messenger RNA of the glmS gene in Gram-positive bacteria. The ribozyme is activated by glucosamine-6-phosphate… 

Metabolite-binding ribozymes.

Mechanism and distribution of glmS ribozymes.

Representatives of glmS ribozymes also serve as excellent experimental models to elucidate how RNAs fold to recognize small molecule ligands and promote chemical transformations.

New RNA motifs suggest an expanded scope for riboswitches in bacterial genetic control.

Six additional elements within the Bacillus subtilis genome that exhibit characteristics of riboswitch function are identified, indicating that riboswitches serve as a major genetic regulatory mechanism for the control of metabolic genes in many microbial species.

The glmS ribozyme: use of a small molecule coenzyme by a gene-regulatory RNA

The presence of the glmS ribozyme in numerous pathogenic bacteria make this RNA an attractive target for the development of new antibiotics and antibacterial strategies and a superb experimental system with which RNA catalysts can exploit small molecule coenzymes to broaden their chemical versatility.

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Application of structural and biophysical approaches has complemented previous genetic and biochemical studies, yielding new information about how different riboswitches operate.

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Three new self-cleaving classes, named twister sister, pistol and hatchet, have been identified from this collection of ribozyme classes, suggesting that even more ribozymes remain hidden in modern cells.

Riboswitch-mediated control of gene expression in eukaryotes

This work reports splicing control in filamentous fungi, green algae, and higher plants by thiamin pyrophosphate-binding riboswitches, the only class of metabolite-sensing RNAs identified in eukaryotes so far.
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