Control of femtosecond pulse filament formation in air through variation of the initial chirp of the pulse

@article{Zhao1997ControlOF,
  title={Control of femtosecond pulse filament formation in air through variation of the initial chirp of the pulse},
  author={Xin Zhao and Ronald J Jones and Charlie E. M. Strauss and David John Funk and J. P. Roberts and A. J. Taylor},
  journal={CLEO '97., Summaries of Papers Presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics},
  year={1997},
  volume={11},
  pages={377-378}
}
  • X. Zhao, R. Jones, +3 authors A. Taylor
  • Published 18 May 1997
  • Materials Science
  • CLEO '97., Summaries of Papers Presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics
3 Citations

Figures from this paper

Videos of light filamentation in air
Light filaments are of interest for applications in remote sensing, communications, and the control of electronic discharges. Different plasma dynamics and emitted radiation have been observedExpand
The effect of propagation in air on the filament spectrum.
TLDR
This work presents filament studies with control over the preparation propagation, in air or vacuum, using an aerodynamic window, and shows how the spectral content of the filament strongly depends on its preparation medium. Expand
Observation of multiple pulse-splitting of ultrashort pulses in air
Summary form only given. It has been shown in 3 + 1 dimensional Kerr-nonlinearity self-focusing models, that group velocity dispersion is responsible for the temporal pulse-splitting of ultrashortExpand

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Conical emission from self-guided femtosecond pulses in air.
TLDR
The conical emission is attributed to Cerenkov radiation from a dynamic self-guiding structure consisting of a weakly ionized core surrounded by Kerr cladding. Expand
Self-channeling of high-peak-power femtosecond laser pulses in air.
TLDR
The self-channeling of ultrashort laser pulses through 20 m of air was demonstrated and a preliminary model is shown to explain these results. Expand
Pulse splitting during self-focusing in normally dispersive media.
TLDR
The numerical simulations show that the dispersion causes the splitting of a pulse before it self-focuses into two temporally separated pulses, which then continue to self-focus and compress rapidly, results in periodic modulation of the generated continuum spectrum, as was recently observed in continuum generation by focused femtosecond pulses in gases. Expand