Control of a Desert-Grassland Transition by a Keystone Rodent Guild

@article{Brown1990ControlOA,
  title={Control of a Desert-Grassland Transition by a Keystone Rodent Guild},
  author={James H Brown and Edward J. Heske},
  journal={Science},
  year={1990},
  volume={250},
  pages={1705 - 1707}
}
Twelve years after three species of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) were removed from plots of Chihuahuan Desert shrub habitat, density of tall perennial and annual grasses had increased approximately threefold and rodent species typical of arid grassland had colonized. These were just the most recent and drmatic in a series of changes in plants and animals caused by experimental exclusion of Dipodomys. In this ecosystem kangaroo rats are a keystone guild: through seed predation and soil… Expand
Effects of kangaroo rat exclusion on vegetation structure and plant species diversity in the Chihuahuan Desert
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