• Corpus ID: 119295782

Contribution of amateur observations to Saturn storm studies

@article{Delcroix2010ContributionOA,
  title={Contribution of amateur observations to Saturn storm studies},
  author={Marc Delcroix and Georg Fischer Commission des observations plan'etaires and Soci'et'e Astronomique de France Space Research Institute and Austrian Academy of Sciences},
  journal={arXiv: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics},
  year={2010}
}
Since 2004, Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs), which are the radio signatures of lightning in Saturn's atmosphere, have been observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument (RPWS). Despite their important time coverage, these observations lack the resolution and positioning given by imaging around visible wavelengths. Amateur observations from Earth have been increasing in quality and coverage since a few years, bringing information on positions, drift rates and shape… 
Overview of Saturn lightning observations
The lightning activity in Saturn's atmosphere has been monitored by Cassini for more than six years. The continuous observations of the radio signatures called SEDs (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges)
First ground observations of Saturn's spokes around 2009 equinox
Since 1980, only spacecraft or space telescope have been able to image spokes (intermittently appearing radial or elongated dark markings in Saturn’s B-ring) around the planet equinoxes. Amateur
Peak electron densities in Saturn's ionosphere derived from the low‐frequency cutoff of Saturn lightning
Radio bursts from Saturn lightning have been observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument at frequencies of a few megahertz during several month-long storms since 2004. As the
Saturn Northern hemisphere's atmosphere after the 2010/2011 Great White Spot
In 2012, after the 2010/2011 Great White Spot (GWS), amateur observations made it possible to follow the evolution of the “GWS zone” centered around 41° planetographic north latitude, in particular
Saturn northern hemisphere's atmosphere and polar hexagon in 2013
In 2013, two years after the dramatic events of the Great White Spot (GWS), amateur astronomers continued to follow the evolution of the “GWS zone” centered around 41° planetographic on Saturn. They

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