Contrasting responses to novelty by wild and captive orangutans

@article{Forss2015ContrastingRT,
  title={Contrasting responses to novelty by wild and captive orangutans},
  author={S. Forss and C. Schuppli and Dominique Haiden and Nicole Zweifel and C. V. van Schaik},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2015},
  volume={77}
}
Several studies have suggested that wild primates tend to behave with caution toward novelty, whereas captive primates are thought to be less neophobic, more exploratory, and more innovative. However, few studies have systematically compared captive and wild individuals of the same species to document this “captivity effect” in greater detail. Here we report the responses of both wild and captive orangutans to the same novel items. Novel objects were presented to wild orangutans on multiple… Expand
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