Contrasting patterns of Y-chromosome variation in South Siberian populations from Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions

@article{Derenko2005ContrastingPO,
  title={Contrasting patterns of Y-chromosome variation in South Siberian populations from Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions},
  author={Miroslava Derenko and Boris A. Malyarchuk and Galina Denisova and Marcin Woźniak and Irina Dambueva and Ch. M. Dorzhu and Faina A. Luzina and Danuta Miścicka-Śliwka and Ilia A. Zakharov},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={118},
  pages={591-604}
}
In order to investigate the genetic history of autochthonous South Siberian populations and to estimate the contribution of distinct patrilineages to their gene pools, we have analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal binary markers (YAP, RPS4Y711, SRY-8299, M89, M201, M52, M170, 12f2, M9, M20, 92R7, SRY-1532, DYS199, M173, M17, Tat, and LLY22 g) in a total sample of 1,358 males from 14 ethnic groups of Siberia (Altaians-Kizhi, Teleuts, Shors, Tuvinians, Todjins, Tofalars, Sojots, Khakassians, Buryats, Evenks… Expand
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