Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in Africa: evidence for sex-biased demographic processes

@article{Wood2005ContrastingPO,
  title={Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in Africa: evidence for sex-biased demographic processes},
  author={Elizabeth T Wood and Daryn A. Stover and Christopher Ehret and Giovanni Destro‐Bisol and Gabriella Spedini and Howard L. McLeod and Leslie G. Louie and Michael J. Bamshad and Beverly I. Strassmann and Himla Soodyall and Michael F. Hammer},
  journal={European Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={867-876}
}
To investigate associations between genetic, linguistic, and geographic variation in Africa, we type 50 Y chromosome SNPs in 1122 individuals from 40 populations representing African geographic and linguistic diversity. We compare these patterns of variation with those that emerge from a similar analysis of published mtDNA HVS1 sequences from 1918 individuals from 39 African populations. For the Y chromosome, Mantel tests reveal a strong partial correlation between genetic and linguistic… 
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