Contrasting effects of supplementary feeding of insects or mineral nutrients on the growth and nitrogen and phosphorous economy of pygmy species of Drosera

@article{Karlsson2004ContrastingEO,
  title={Contrasting effects of supplementary feeding of insects or mineral nutrients on the growth and nitrogen and phosphorous economy of pygmy species of Drosera},
  author={P. Staffan Karlsson and John S. Pate},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={92},
  pages={8-13}
}
SummaryGrowth responses and accumulation of N and P were studied in two pygmy south-west Australian species of Drosera following supplementary feeding of arthropods (collembolans, Hypogastrura vernalis and fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster) and/or a balanced mineral nutrient supplement (N as nitrate) via the roots. One feeding experiment used glasshouse-raised germlings from vegetative propagules (gemmae) of the perennial Drosera closterostigma, the other three (two on D. closterostigma and… 

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