Contrasting approaches to the response-contingent learning of young children with significant delays and their social-emotional consequences.

Abstract

AIMS The purpose of the analyses described in this paper was to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of two different approaches to child response-contingent learning on rates of child learning and both concomitant and collateral child social-emotional behaviour. METHOD The participants were 71 children with significant developmental delays or multiple disabilities randomly assigned to either of the two contrasting approaches to interventions. RESULTS Findings showed that an intervention which employed practices that built on existing child behaviour (asset-based practices) was more effective than an intervention focusing on teaching children missing skills (needs-based practices) for influencing changes in the rates of child learning as well as rates of child social-emotional behaviour mediated by differences in rates of child learning. IMPLICATIONS Both the theoretical and practical importance of the results are described in terms of the extended social-emotional benefits of asset-based response-contingent learning games.

DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2017.02.009

Cite this paper

@article{Dunst2017ContrastingAT, title={Contrasting approaches to the response-contingent learning of young children with significant delays and their social-emotional consequences.}, author={Carl J . Dunst and Melinda Raab and Deborah W. Hamby}, journal={Research in developmental disabilities}, year={2017}, volume={63}, pages={67-73} }