Contrast effects do not underlie effects of preceding liquids on stop-consonant identification by humans.

@article{Fowler2000ContrastED,
  title={Contrast effects do not underlie effects of preceding liquids on stop-consonant identification by humans.},
  author={Carol A. Fowler and J. Alison Brown and Virginia A. Mann},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance},
  year={2000},
  volume={26 3},
  pages={877-88}
}
These experiments explored the claim by A. Lotto and K. Kluender (1998) that frequency contrast explains listeners' compensations for coarticulation in the case of liquid consonants coarticulating with following stops. Evidence of frequency contrast in experiments that tested for it directly was not found, but Lotto and Kluender's finding that high- and low-frequency precursor tones can produce contrastive effects on stop-consonant judgments were replicated. The effect depends on the amplitude… CONTINUE READING

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