Contrast and Post-Velar Fronting in Russian

@article{Padgett2003ContrastAP,
  title={Contrast and Post-Velar Fronting in Russian},
  author={Jaye Padgett},
  journal={Natural Language \& Linguistic Theory},
  year={2003},
  volume={21},
  pages={39-87}
}
  • Jaye Padgett
  • Published 1 February 2003
  • Linguistics
  • Natural Language & Linguistic Theory
There is a well-known rule of Russianwhereby /i/ is said to be realized as [į] after non-palatalized consonants. Somewhat less well known is another allophonic rule of Russian whereby only [i], and not [į], can follow velars within a morphological word. This latter rule came about due to a sound change in East Slavic called post-velar fronting here: kį > kji(and similarlyfor the other velars). This paper examines this sound change in depth, and argues that it can be adequately explained only by… 
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