Contours of time: Topographic construals of past, present, and future in the Yupno valley of Papua New Guinea

@article{Nez2012ContoursOT,
  title={Contours of time: Topographic construals of past, present, and future in the Yupno valley of Papua New Guinea},
  author={Rafael N{\'u}{\~n}ez and Kensy Cooperrider and D Doan and J{\"u}rg Wassmann},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2012},
  volume={124},
  pages={25-35}
}

Figures and Tables from this paper

The Space-Time Topography of English Speakers.
TLDR
This dissertation shows that English speakers construe Time through fine-grained topographical space, with tomorrow physically closer to a deictic center than next year, and serves as a first map of English speakers’ space-time topography, providing a new perspective on the interaction of language and cognition when speakers cognize temporal events.
Uphill and Downhill in a Flat World: The Conceptual Topography of the Yupno House
TLDR
The house is treated as a microworld, with a "conceptual topography" that is strikingly reminiscent of the physical topography of the Yupno valley, which illustrates some of the distinctive properties of environment-based reference systems, as well as the universal power and plasticity of spatial contrasts.
Spatialization of Time in Mian
TLDR
Examining representations of time among the Mianmin of Papua New Guinea reveals evidence for a variety of temporal representations and suggests an increase in left to right temporal representations with increasing years of formal education.
Multi-directional mappings in the minds of the Tsimane': Size, time, and number on three spatial axes
TLDR
The results are inconsistent with predictions of the Generalized Magnitude System proposal but can be explained by Hierarchical Mental Metaphor Theory, according to which mental mappings initially reflect a set of correlations observable in the natural world.
With the future coming up behind them: Evidence that Time approaches from behind in Vietnamese
Abstract Vietnamese speakers can describe the future as behind them and gesture forwards to indicate the past, which suggests they use a conceptual model of Time in which the future is behind and the
Time in terms of space
TLDR
The papers in this collection provide new information about how time and space are expressed in little-known languages, and thus provide an important resource for scholars interested in linguistic mappings.
Elevation as a Grammatical and Semantic Category of Demonstratives
TLDR
It is tentatively concluded that languages spoken in similar topographic environments do not tend to have similar systems of elevational demonstratives if they belong to different language families.
Your Space or Mine? Mapping Self in Time
TLDR
The results demonstrate the malleability of space-time mapping and suggest that there is a self-specific conceptualization of time that may influence MTT as well as other temporally relevant cognitive phenomena.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
Re-mapping topographic terms indoors : A study of everyday spatial construals in the mountains of Papua New Guinea
The Yupno of Papua New Guinea make extensive use of topographic terms—such as uphill and downhill—for conceptualizing spatial relations (Wassmann, 1994). Given the ubiquity of topographic
THE YUPNO AS POST-NEWTONIAN SCIENTISTS: THE QUESTION OF WHAT IS 'NATURAL IN SPATIAL DESCRIPTION
Cognitive scientists were induced by the (European) cultures and (Indogermanic) languages already known to them to formulate over-hasty generalizations about the intrinsic structure of human
With the Future Behind Them: Convergent Evidence From Aymara Language and Gesture in the Crosslinguistic Comparison of Spatial Construals of Time
Cognitive research on metaphoric concepts of time has focused on differences between moving Ego and moving time models, but even more basic is the contrast between Ego- and temporal-reference-point
SPACE, TIME, SEMANTICS, AND THE CHILD
Cross-Cultural Differences in Mental Representations of Time: Evidence From an Implicit Nonlinguistic Task
TLDR
It appears that people automatically access culturally specific spatial representations when making temporal judgments even in nonlinguistic tasks.
Space-to-time mappings and temporal concepts
Abstract Most research on metaphors that construe time as motion (motion metaphors of time) has focused on the question of whether it is the times or the person experiencing them (ego) that moves.
Variation in memory for body movements across cultures
Space in Language and Cognition
Levinson's book aims to show how language affects even a core cognitive domain such as spatial thinking. A domain that is regarded in most cognitive literature as possibly the strongest candidate for
Spatial schemas and abstract thought
TLDR
This book proposes the means by which spatial structures might be adapted for nonspatial purposes, and it considers alternatives to spatial coding as a basis for abstract thought.
Writing Direction Influences Spatial Cognition
Writing Direction Influences Spatial Cognition Ting Ting Chan (tingc@hawaii.edu) Benjamin Bergen (bergen@hawaii.edu) Dept of Linguistics, 569 Moore Hall, 1890 East-West Hall Honolulu, HI 96822
...
...