Continuum‐Driven Winds from Super‐Eddington Stars: A Tale of Two Limits

@article{Marle2008ContinuumDrivenWF,
  title={Continuum‐Driven Winds from Super‐Eddington Stars: A Tale of Two Limits},
  author={A. J. van Marle and Stanley P. Owocki and Nir J. Shaviv},
  journal={arXiv: Astrophysics},
  year={2008},
  volume={990},
  pages={250-253}
}
Continuum driving is an effective method to drive a strong stellar wind. It is governed by two limits: the Eddington limit and the photon‐tiring limit. A star must exceed the effective Eddington limit for continuum driving to overcome the stellar gravity. The photon‐tiring limit places an upper limit on the mass loss rate that can be driven to infinity, given the energy available in the radiation field of the star. Since continuum driving does not require the presence of metals in the stellar… 

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