Continuous positive airway pressure for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in stroke survivors: what do we really know?

@article{Tomfohr2012ContinuousPA,
  title={Continuous positive airway pressure for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in stroke survivors: what do we really know?},
  author={Lianne M. Tomfohr and Thomas G Hemmen and Loki Natarajan and Sonia Ancoli-Israel and Jos{\'e} S. Loredo and Robert K. Heaton and Wayne A. Bardwell and Paul J. Mills and Roland R. Lee and Joel E. Dimsdale},
  journal={Stroke},
  year={2012},
  volume={43 11},
  pages={3118-23}
}
O bstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has serious cardiovas-cular consequences and increases the risk of stroke. OSA is common in patients with stroke 3,4 and is associated with impaired quality of life, reduced cognitive function, and excessive fatigue, 5–7 conditions that are common in stroke victims and that may delay poststroke recovery. It is possible that treating OSA could improve clinical recovery in patients with stroke. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the " gold standard… CONTINUE READING