Continued Growth of the Central Nervous System without Mandatory Addition of Neurons in the Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)

@article{Ngwenya2016ContinuedGO,
  title={Continued Growth of the Central Nervous System without Mandatory Addition of Neurons in the Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)},
  author={Ayanda Ngwenya and Nina Patzke and Paul R. Manger and Suzana Herculano-Houzel},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2016},
  volume={87},
  pages={19 - 38}
}
It is generally believed that animals with larger bodies require larger brains, composed of more neurons. [...] Key Method In the current study we use the isotropic fractionator method of cell counting to determine how the number of neurons and non-neurons in 6 specific brain regions and the spinal cord change with increasing body mass in the Nile crocodile. The central nervous system (CNS) structures examined all increase in mass as a function of body mass, with allometric exponents of around 0.2, except for…Expand
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