Continental breakup and the ordinal diversification of birds and mammals

@article{Hedges1996ContinentalBA,
  title={Continental breakup and the ordinal diversification of birds and mammals},
  author={S. Blair Hedges and Patrick H. Parker and Charles G. Sibley and Sudhir Kumar},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={381},
  pages={226-229}
}
THE classical hypothesis for the diversification of birds and mammals proposes that most of the orders diverged rapidly in adaptive radiations after the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) extinction event 65 million years ago1–3. Evidence is provided by the near-absence of fossils representing modern orders before the K/T boundary4,5. However, fossil-based estimates of divergence time are known to be conservative because of sampling biases6, and some molecular/time estimates point to earlier divergences… Expand
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