Context-specific use suggests that bottlenose dolphin signature whistles are cohesion calls

@article{Janik1998ContextspecificUS,
  title={Context-specific use suggests that bottlenose dolphin signature whistles are cohesion calls},
  author={V. Janik and P. Slater},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={56},
  pages={829-838}
}
  • V. Janik, P. Slater
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Studies on captive bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, have shown that each individual produces a stereotyped, individually specific signature whistle; however, no study has demonstrated clear context-dependent usage of these whistles. Thus, the hypothesis that signature whistles are used to maintain group cohesion remains untested. To investigate whether signature whistles are used only in contexts that would require a mechanism to maintain group cohesion, we examined whistle type usage… CONTINUE READING

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