Context-dependent linear dominance hierarchies in social groups of European badgers, Meles meles

@article{Hewitt2009ContextdependentLD,
  title={Context-dependent linear dominance hierarchies in social groups of European badgers, Meles meles
},
  author={Stacey E. Hewitt and David W. Macdonald and Hannah L. Dugdale},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={77},
  pages={161-169}
}
A social hierarchy is generally assumed to exist in those mammalian societies in which the costs and benefits of group living are distributed unevenly among group members. We analysed infrared closed-circuit television footage, collected over 3 years in Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire, to test whether social groups of European badgers have dominance hierarchies. Analysis of directed aggression between dyads revealed linear dominance hierarchies in three social-group-years, but patterns within social… Expand
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