Context-dependent genetic benefits of extra-pair mate choice in a socially monogamous passerine

@article{OBrien2006ContextdependentGB,
  title={Context-dependent genetic benefits of extra-pair mate choice in a socially monogamous passerine},
  author={Erin L. O’Brien and Russell D. Dawson},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={61},
  pages={775-782}
}
Extra-pair paternity is common in socially monogamous passerines; however, despite considerable research attention, consistent differences in fitness between within-pair offspring (WPO) and extra-pair offspring (EPO) have not been demonstrated. Recent evidence indicates that differences between maternal half-siblings may depend on environmental conditions, but it is unclear whether the influence of paternal genetic contribution should be most apparent under comparatively poor or favourable… 
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