Contemporaneity of Dorset and Thule Cultures in the North American Arctic: New Radiocarbon Dates from Victoria Island, Nunavut1

@article{Friesen2004ContemporaneityOD,
  title={Contemporaneity of Dorset and Thule Cultures in the North American Arctic: New Radiocarbon Dates from Victoria Island, Nunavut1},
  author={T. Max Friesen},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2004},
  volume={45},
  pages={685 - 691}
}
  • T. Friesen
  • Published 1 December 2004
  • Environmental Science
  • Current Anthropology
The prehistoric cultural sequence in the eastern North American Arctic is divided into two major traditions. People of the earlier Palaeo-Eskimo tradition entered the eastern Arctic from Alaska about 4,500 years ago and then gradually changed and adapted, developing through a series of cultures which archaeologists have named Independence I, Saqqaq, Pre-Dorset, and Dorset. The Neo-Eskimo tradition followed, entering the western Canadian Arctic from Alaska around 1,000 years ago and proceeding… 
Radiocarbon Evidence for Fourteenth-Century Dorset Occupation in the Eastern North American Arctic
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