Contact allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine

@article{Groot1995ContactAT,
  title={Contact allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine},
  author={Anton C. Groot and Henk B. Walle and J. W. Weyland},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={1995},
  volume={33}
}
Cocamidopropyl betaine is an amphoteric surfactant used increasingly in cosmetic products. We describe 20 cases of cosmetic allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine; all were caused by shampoo or shower gel. 8 patients were hairdressers, who had occupational allergic contact dermatitis from shampoos. We recommend patch testing cocamidopropyl betaine 1%. aq. routinely in hairdressers with dermatitis of the hands, and in all patients suspected of suffering from cosmetic allergy. 
Cocamidopropyl betaine.
Cheilitis caused by contact allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine in ‘2‐in‐1 toothpaste and mouthwash’
TLDR
The case of a 10‐year‐old girl with a 2‐year history of severe cheilitis highlights the importance of excluding a contact allergy to this product in patients with intractableCheilitis.
Pure cocamidopropylbetaine is not the allergen in patients with positive reactions to commercial cocamidopropylbetaine
TLDR
Allergic contact dermatitis from antimycotic imidazoles is uncommon when compared to their widespread use, and the high concentration of tioconazole, the presence of undecylenic acid and of ethyl acetate in the vehicle, as well as its application to periungual folds are all factors favouring sensitization.
Positive patch test to cocamidopropyl betaine in a hairdresser
TLDR
Examination showed erythematous, irregularly shaped, lichenified plaques over the extensor aspects of the fingers and flexor aspect of the right wrist.
Safety to human skin of cocamidopropyl betaine: A mild surfactant for personal-care products
TLDR
A 6-wk product-use study was conducted to determine whether subjects with previous positive patch tests to CAPB could use personal-care products with this surfactant without problems, and suggested that amidoamine, a material used in the synthesis of CAPB and a contaminant ofCAPB preparations, is a likely sensitizer.
Allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine may be due to amidoamine : a patch test and product use test study
TLDR
Most subjects who were patch-test-positive showed a reaction when using CAPB-containing skin and hair care products, and the results do not rule out the possibility that CAPB itself may be an allergen in rare cases.
Sensitization to cocamidopropylbetaine: an 8‐year review
TLDR
EuxylAK400 is a biocide containing 2 active ingredients, phenoxyethanol and methyldibromo glutaronitrile, in a 4:1 ratio and sensitization is most commonly acquired through exposure to cosmetics and moistened toilet tissue.
Allergic contact dermatitis: cosmetics
TLDR
The recent introduction of mandatory ingredient labelling in the European Union has greatly facilitated diagnostic procedures in patients suspected to suffer from cosmetic allergy, and enables these allergic patients to avoid products containing substances that will cause allergic contact dermatitis in them.
Pre-Emptive Avoidance Strategy (P.E.A.S.) – addressing allergic contact dermatitis in pediatric populations
TLDR
It is estimated that one third of children suffering from ACD could potentially benefit from a ‘pre-emptive avoidance strategy’ (P.E.A.S.) of the stated top 10 allergens.
144 Contact Dermatitis: Diagnosis and Therapy
TLDR
Data from multiple international tertiary care centers serve as a useful guide in the selection of allergens used for patch testing, especially given that many of the same allergens appear across the lists globally.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
Contact dermatitis from cocamidopropyl betaine
TLDR
4 women were positive to cocamidopropyl betaine (CPB) 1.0% aq.
Cocamidopropyl betaine: the significance of positive patch test results in twelve patients.
TLDR
It is concluded that although cocamidopropyl betaine is not a common allergen, it may be at least partially responsible for some cases of allergic dermatitis of the head and neck.
Shampoo dermatitis due to cocamidopropyl betaine
A 22-year-old male hairdresser, with no family or personal history of atopy, presented with erythematous swelling lesions on his hands, fingers and forearms. Complete blood and urine hematochemical
Contact allergy to cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB)
TLDR
4. Raulin C, Frosch P J, Green C A, Farr P M, Shuster S, Veraldi S, Schianchi-Veraldi R.
Human irritant response to qualities and concentrations of cocoamidopropylbetaines: a possible model of paradoxical irritant response
TLDR
It is believed that noninvasive methods such as TEWL and LDF could be of treat use in the evaluation of irritant contact dermatitis.
Manual of Contact Dermatitis
Fregert'sManual of Contact Dermatitisis packed with useful information and is highly recommended as a primer for those learning dermatology and as a brief refresher text for the practicing clinician.
Eyelid dermatitis due to cocamidopropyl betaine in an eye make‐up remover
A 60-year-old woman had a 2-month history of eyelid eczema, with no personal or family history of atopy. Patch testing to the European standard series, a series of facial allergens, and her own
Shampoo dermatitis due to cocobetaine and sodium lauryl ether sulphate
TLDR
The dermatitis cleared when the patient changed to a shampoo with a sodium Iaury! ether sulphate base with sorbic acid as the preservative.
Human irritant response to different qualities and concentrations of cocoamidopropylbetaines: a possible model of paradoxical irritant response.
TLDR
The results with the different concentrations were paradoxical, as irritancy did not increase at higher concentrations, and noninvasive methods such as TEWL and LDF could be of great use in the evaluation of irritant contact dermatitis.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...