Contact Languages: Ecology and Evolution in Asia

@inproceedings{Ansaldo2009ContactLE,
  title={Contact Languages: Ecology and Evolution in Asia},
  author={U. Ansaldo},
  year={2009}
}
Why do groups of speakers in certain times and places come up with new varieties of languages? What are the social settings that determine whether a mixed language, a pidgin, or a Creole will develop, and how can we understand the ways in which different languages contribute to the new grammar? Through the study of Malay contact varieties such as Baba and Bazaar Malay, Cocos Malay, and Sri Lanka Malay, as well as the Asian Portuguese vernacular of Macau, and China Coast Pidgin, the book… Expand
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