Contact Englishes of the Eastern Caribbean

@inproceedings{Aceto2003ContactEO,
  title={Contact Englishes of the Eastern Caribbean},
  author={Michael Aceto and Jeffrey P. Williams},
  year={2003}
}
1. Map 2. Preface 3. Introduction (by Aceto, Michael) 4. Defining ethnic varieties in the Bahamas: Phonological accommodation in black and white enclave communities (by Childs, Becky) 5. The grammatical features of TMA auxiliaries in Bahamian Creole (by McPhee, Helean) 6. English in the Turks and Caicos Islands: A look at Grand Turk (by Cutler, Cecelia A.) 7. Language variety in the Virgin Islands: Plural markings (by Sabino, Robin) 8. The establishment and perpetuation of Anglophone white… Expand
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