Consumption of coffee, green tea, oolong tea, black tea, chocolate snacks and the caffeine content in relation to risk of diabetes in Japanese men and women

@article{Oba2009ConsumptionOC,
  title={Consumption of coffee, green tea, oolong tea, black tea, chocolate snacks and the caffeine content in relation to risk of diabetes in Japanese men and women},
  author={Shino Oba and Chisato Nagata and Kozue Nakamura and Kaori Fujii and Toshiaki Kawachi and Naoyoshi Takatsuka and Hiroyuki Shimizu},
  journal={British Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2009},
  volume={103},
  pages={453 - 459}
}
Although the inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of diabetes has been reported numerous times, the role of caffeine intake in this association has remained unclear. We evaluated the consumption of coffee and other beverages and food containing caffeine in relation to the incidence of diabetes. The study participants were 5897 men and 7643 women in a community-based cohort in Takayama, Japan. Consumption of coffee, green tea, oolong tea, black tea and chocolate snacks were… 

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...

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