Consumer Sleep Tracking Devices: A Critical Review

@article{Lee2015ConsumerST,
  title={Consumer Sleep Tracking Devices: A Critical Review},
  author={Jeon Lee and Joseph Finkelstein},
  journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
  year={2015},
  volume={210},
  pages={
          458-60
        }
}
Consumer sleep tracking devices are widely advertised as effective means to monitor and manage sleep quality and to provide positive effects on overall heath. However objective evidence supporting these claims is not always readily available. The goal of this study was to perform a comprehensive review of available information on six representative sleep tracking devices: BodyMedia FIT, Fitbit Flex, Jawbone UP, Basis Band, Innovative Sleep Solutions SleepTracker, and Zeo Sleep Manager Pro. The… 
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