Construction costs, payback times, and the leaf economics of carnivorous plants.

@article{Karagatzides2009ConstructionCP,
  title={Construction costs, payback times, and the leaf economics of carnivorous plants.},
  author={Jim D. Karagatzides and Aaron M. Ellison},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2009},
  volume={96 9},
  pages={
          1612-9
        }
}
Understanding how different plant species and functional types "invest" carbon and nutrients is a major goal of plant ecologists. Two measures of such investments are "construction costs" (carbon needed to produce each gram of tissue) and associated "payback times" for photosynthesis to recover construction costs. These measurements integrate among traits used to assess leaf-trait scaling relationships. Carnivorous plants are model systems for examining mechanisms of leaf-trait coordination… Expand
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