Constraining the timing of whole genome duplication in plant evolutionary history

@article{Clark2017ConstrainingTT,
  title={Constraining the timing of whole genome duplication in plant evolutionary history},
  author={James W. Clark and Philip C. J. Donoghue},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={284}
}
Whole genome duplication (WGD) has occurred in many lineages within the tree of life and is invariably invoked as causal to evolutionary innovation, increased diversity, and extinction resistance. Testing such hypotheses is problematic, not least since the timing of WGD events has proven hard to constrain. Here we show that WGD events can be dated through molecular clock analysis of concatenated gene families, calibrated using fossil evidence for the ages of species divergences that bracket WGD… 

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