Constraining the Time Interval for the Origin of Life on Earth.

@article{Pearce2018ConstrainingTT,
  title={Constraining the Time Interval for the Origin of Life on Earth.},
  author={Ben K D Pearce and Andrew S. Tupper and Ralph Egon Pudritz and Paul G. Higgs},
  journal={Astrobiology},
  year={2018},
  volume={18 3},
  pages={
          343-364
        }
}
Estimates of the time at which life arose on Earth make use of two types of evidence. First, astrophysical and geophysical studies provide a timescale for the formation of Earth and the Moon, for large impact events on early Earth, and for the cooling of the early magma ocean. From this evidence, we can deduce a habitability boundary, which is the earliest point at which Earth became habitable. Second, biosignatures in geological samples, including microfossils, stromatolites, and chemical… Expand
Origin of Life on Mars: Suitability and Opportunities
TLDR
The relatively well-preserved ancient surface of planet Mars helps inform the range of possible analogous conditions during the now-obliterated history of early Earth. Expand
Estimating survival probability using the terrestrial extinction history for the search for extraterrestrial life
Several exoplanets have been discovered to date, and the next step is the search for extraterrestrial life. However, it is difficult to estimate the number of life-bearing exoplanets because our onlyExpand
Habitable zone predictions and how to test them.
The habitable zone (HZ) is the region around a star(s) where standing bodies of water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The classical HZ definition makes a number of assumptions common toExpand
The Timing of Evolutionary Transitions Suggests Intelligent Life is Rare
TLDR
It is demonstrated that expected evolutionary transition times likely exceed the lifetime of Earth, perhaps by many orders of magnitude, corroborate the original argument suggested by Brandon Carter that intelligent life in the Universe is exceptionally rare. Expand
In search of the RNA world on Mars
TLDR
It is proposed that Mars, a planet frozen in time, is the best alternative to search for environments consistent with geochemical requirements imposed by the RNA world, as well as in situ and orbital observations of Mars and modeling of its early atmosphere into solutions containing a range of pHs and concentrations of prebiotically relevant metals. Expand
Milestones in Early Evolution
During much of its early history Earth was dominated by an oxygen-poor, CO2+CO+methane-rich atmosphere, with several thousand to tens of thousands ppm CO2, inducing high-temperature low-pH acid oceanExpand
In search of the RNA world on Mars
TLDR
It is proposed that Mars, a planet frozen in time, is the best alternative to search for environments consistent with geochemical requirements imposed by the RNA world, and whether early Mars could have been permissive toward the accumulation of long‐lived RNA polymers is evaluated. Expand
Does the Evolution of Complex Life Depend on the Stellar Spectral Energy Distribution?
TLDR
The proportional evolutionary time (PET) hypothesis predicts that late K- and M-dwarf stars are too young to host any complex life at the present age of the Universe, and represent the best targets for the next generation of space telescopes to search for spectroscopic biosignatures indicative of complex life. Expand
Co-evolution of primitive methane-cycling ecosystems and early Earth’s atmosphere and climate
TLDR
On early Earth, the evolution of microbes producing and consuming methane likely controlled warming and glacial events, and thus Earth’s habitability, and a low CO:CH 4 atmospheric ratio emerges as a robust signature of simple methane-cycling ecosystems on a globally reduced planet such as the late Hadean/early Archean Earth. Expand
Testing S isotopes as biomarkers for Mars
Abstract We suggest testing S isotopes as biomarkers for Mars. An analogous robust biosignature has recently been proposed for the forthcoming exploration of the icy surface of Europa, and in theExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 132 REFERENCES
Evidence for life on Earth before 3,800 million years ago
IT is unknown when life first appeared on Earth. The earliest known microfossils (˜3,500 Myr before present) are structurally complex, and if it is assumed that the associated organisms required aExpand
Evidence from detrital zircons for the existence of continental crust and oceans on the Earth 4.4 Gyr ago
TLDR
The discovery of a detrital zircon with an age as old as 4,404 ± 8 Myr is reported, about 130 million years older than any previously identified on Earth and represents the earliest evidence for continental crust and oceans on the Earth. Expand
Highly siderophile elements in Earth’s mantle as a clock for the Moon-forming impact
TLDR
A large number of N-body simulations are used to demonstrate a relationship between the time of the last giant impact on an Earth-like planet and the amount of mass subsequently added during the era known as Late Accretion, and the concentration of highly siderophile elements in Earth’s mantle constrains the mass of chondritic material added to Earth during LateAccretion. Expand
Oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere–ocean system: A review of physical and chemical sedimentologic responses
Abstract The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is one of the most significant changes in seawater and atmospheric chemistry in Earth history. This rise in oxygen occurred between ca. 2.4 and 2.3 Ga and setExpand
Emergence of a Habitable Planet
Abstract We address the first several hundred million years of Earth’s history. The Moon-forming impact left Earth enveloped in a hot silicate atmosphere that cooled and condensed over ∼1,000 yrs. AsExpand
The Hadean-Archaean environment.
  • N. Sleep
  • Physics, Medicine
  • Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology
  • 2010
TLDR
Overall, mantle derived rocks, especially kimberlites and similar CO(2)-rich magmas, preserve evidence of subducted upper oceanic crust, ancient surface environments, and biosignatures of photosynthesis. Expand
The Continuing Puzzle of the Great Oxidation Event
TLDR
The goal in this review is to provide a short summary of the current state of the field, and make the case that future progress towards solving the riddle of oxygen will benefit greatly from the involvement of molecular biologists. Expand
Rapid emergence of life shown by discovery of 3,700-million-year-old microbial structures
TLDR
Evidence for ancient life from a newly exposed outcrop of 3,700-Myr-old metacarbonate rocks in the ISB that contain 1–4-cm-high stromatolites demonstrates the establishment of shallow marine carbonate production with biotic CO2 sequestration by 3-700 million years ago, near the start of Earth’s sedimentary record. Expand
Evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis half a billion years before the Great Oxidation Event
The early Earth was characterized by the absence of oxygen in the ocean–atmosphere system, in contrast to the well-oxygenated conditions that prevail today. Atmospheric concentrations first rose toExpand
Changing the picture of Earth's earliest fossils (3.5–1.9 Ga) with new approaches and new discoveries
TLDR
Novel 3D nanoscale reconstructions of the most ancient complex fossil Eosphaera reveal features hitherto unmatched in any crown-group microbe, and a stronger conclusion is that multicellular morphospace was differently occupied in the Paleoproterozoic. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...