Constituency Cleavages and Congressional Parties

@article{Jenkins2004ConstituencyCA,
  title={Constituency Cleavages and Congressional Parties},
  author={Jeffery A. Jenkins and Eric Schickler and Jamie L. Carson},
  journal={Social Science History},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={537 - 573}
}
We analyze the constituency bases of the congressional parties from 1857 through 1913 by focusing on two key concepts: party homogeneity and party polarization. With a few notable exceptions, prior efforts to assess these concepts have relied upon measures based on members’ roll call votes. This is potentially problematic, as such measures are likely endogenous: They reflect the party’s actual level of success as much as the party’s underlying homogeneity. To address this problem, we construct… 
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