Constantine and Eusebius

@inproceedings{Barnes1981ConstantineAE,
  title={Constantine and Eusebius},
  author={Timothy D. Barnes},
  year={1981}
}
PART ONE: Constantine 1. Diocletian and Maximiam 2. Galerius and the Christians 3. The Rise of Constantine 4. The Christian Emperor of the West 5. Constantine and Licinius PART TWO: Eusebius 6. Origen and Caesarea 7. Biblical Scholarship and the Chronicle 8. The History of the Church 9. Persecution 10. Eusebius as Apologist PART THREE: The Christian Empire 11. Before Constantine 12. The Council of Nicaea 13. Ecclesiastical Politics 14. The New Monarchy 15. Eusebius and Constantine Epilogue… 
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