Conspecific brood parasitism as a flexible female reproductive tactic in American coots

@article{Lyon1993ConspecificBP,
  title={Conspecific brood parasitism as a flexible female reproductive tactic in American coots},
  author={Bruce E. Lyon},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1993},
  volume={46},
  pages={911-928}
}
  • B. Lyon
  • Published 1 November 1993
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract Abstract. Conspecific brood parasitism was a common component of reproduction in a population of American coots, Fulica americana , in central British Columbia, Canada. In a 4-year study, over 40% of nests were parasitized and 13% of all eggs were laid parasitically. Parasitism occurred in several ecological contexts, each involving different constraints and trade-offs. A quarter of the parasitic eggs were attributed to floater females without nests or territories of their own. The… 
Ecological and social constraints on conspecific brood parasitism by nesting female American coots (Fulica americana)
  • B. Lyon
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • 2003
TLDR
The large number of correlates of parasitism indicates that parasitism by nesting females is a conditional reproductive tactic, not part of a stochastic mixed evolutionary stable strategy, and suggests that variation in egg-laying capacity may determine whether females benefit from allocating eggs to parasitism.
Relative reproductive success of female moorhens using conditional strategies of brood parasitism and parental care
  • S. McRae
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • 1998
TLDR
An experiment in which parasitic eggs were removed and hosts left to rear only their own young showed that parasites did not choose hosts that were better parents than pairs with contemporary nests that were not parasitized, and the variance in reproductive success of nesting brood parasites was significantly higher than that of nonparasites.
Intraspecific brood parasitism as a conditional reproductive tactic in the treehopper Publilia concava
  • A. Zink
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2003
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that brood parasitism may be the preferred tactic, as part of a conditional strategy, when hosts are readily available with solitary breeding being the preferred tactics when host broods are in short supply.
Brood parasitism, relatedness and sociality: a kinship role in female reproductive tactics
TLDR
Genetic evidence shows that also New World quails have female‐biased natal philopatry, CBP and brood merging, inviting further study and comparison with waterfowl and Kin‐related parasitism also occurs in some insects, with revealing parallels and differences compared to birds.
Brood Parasitism and Nest Takeover in Common Eiders
TLDR
Protein fingerprinting of egg albumen is used to distinguish the eggs from different females and to estimate the frequency, pattern and tactics of CBP and other forms of mixed maternity in a Hudson Bay population of common eiders, indicating that traditional non-molecular methods of identifying foreign eggs may considerably underestimate the frequency of mixed clutches.
Kin-biased conspecific brood parasitism in a native Mandarin duck population
TLDR
Based on results, relatedness plays a role in CBP in Mandarin ducks, though the explicit fitness benefits to both the host and the parasite still need to be determined.
Conspecific brood parasitism and egg quality in blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus
TLDR
It is suggested that a shortage of available nest sites caused some females to use CBP as a best-of-a bad job strategy, but that either the occurrence of CBP is too rare to lead to strong selection for egg adjustments or that parasitizing females are unable to do so.
Patterns of conspecific brood parasitism in zebra finches
High frequency of conspecific brood parasitism in a colonial waterbird, the Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis
TLDR
Egg loss was more common at parasitized nests than unparasitized nests, but further studies are needed to confirm whether this is due to egg rejection by hosts, and a comparison of clutch size information collected 40 years ago indicates that parasitism may be a regular feature of Eared Grebe reproduction.
Tactics of parasitic American coots: host choice and the pattern of egg dispersion among host nests
  • B. Lyon
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Examining the tactics adopted by a conspecific brood parasite, the American coot, and the degree to which these tactics reflect sources of mortality for parasitic eggs, found no evidence for non-random host choice, either on the basis of stage of thehost's nesting cycle or the host's brood size.
...
...