Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms

@article{Hausmann2016ConsortiaOL,
  title={Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms},
  author={B. Hausmann and K. Knorr and K. Schreck and S. Tringe and T. Glavina del Rio and Alexander Loy and Michael Pester},
  journal={The ISME Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={10},
  pages={2365 - 2375}
}
Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands is sustained by a cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174… Expand
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