Considering PTSD for DSM‐5

@article{Friedman2011ConsideringPF,
  title={Considering PTSD for DSM‐5},
  author={Matthew J. Friedman and Patricia A. Resick and Richard A. Bryant and Chris R. Brewin},
  journal={Depression and Anxiety},
  year={2011},
  volume={28}
}
This is a review of the relevant empirical literature concerning the DSM‐IV‐TR diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Most of this work has focused on Criteria A1 and A2, the two components of the A (Stressor) Criterion. With regard to A1, the review considers: (a) whether A1 is etiologically or temporally related to the PTSD symptoms; (b) whether it is possible to distinguish “traumatic” from “non‐traumatic” stressors; and (c) whether A1 should be eliminated from DSM‐5. Empirical literature regarding… Expand
Finalizing PTSD in DSM-5: getting here from there and where to go next.
  • M. Friedman
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of traumatic stress
  • 2013
TLDR
The rationale is presented that led to the creation of the new chapter, "Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders," within the DSM-5 metastructure, and the very different approaches taken by DSM- 5 and ICD-11 should have a profound effect on future research and practice. Expand
Is DSM-IV criterion A2 associated with PTSD diagnosis and symptom severity?
TLDR
In the current study of 908 veterans who screened positive for a traumatic event, A2 was not significantly associated with having been told by a doctor that the veteran had PTSD, and its association with PTSD symptom severity warrants further exploration of its utility. Expand
Blame, PTSD and DSM-5: an urgent need for clarification
  • T. Greene
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • European journal of psychotraumatology
  • 2018
TLDR
There is evidence that blame is associated with other PTSD symptoms, is clinically relevant and may be an important intervention target in therapy, and standard assessment tools fail to accurately represent the criteria as currently formulated. Expand
Contribution of criterion A2 to PTSD screening in the presence of traumatic events.
TLDR
It appears that Criterion A2 is scarcely specific and provides little information to confirm a probable PTSD case. Expand
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TLDR
Criteria modification and textual clarifications are suggested to further improve the cross‐cultural applicability of the PTSD criteria as defined in DSM‐IV‐TR, and options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM‐5 are presented. Expand
The DSM-5 got PTSD right: comment on Friedman (2013).
TLDR
This commentary argues that the placement of PTSD in the DSM-5 category of Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders is a major advance because it draws attention to the role of "nurture" when there is an overemphasis on "nature" by some. Expand
Examining potential overlap of DSM-5 PTSD criteria D and E
TLDR
Results suggest that the new cognitive and emotional symptoms of criterion D have significant overlapping content, and that thought-related symptoms are often endorsed in conjunction with their behavioral counterpoint (D2/E3; D4/E1). Expand
Sometimes Less is More: Establishing the Core Symptoms of PTSD.
TLDR
A previously proposed set of "core" PTSD criteria in identifying cases of PTSD within a veteran sample supported a parsimonious set of core criteria in the assessment and diagnosis of PTSD. Expand
A confirmatory factor analysis of the PTSD checklist 5 in veteran and college student samples
An important change in the conceptualization of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been the shift from a three-factor model used in the DSM-IV-TR to the current four-factor model used in DSM-5.Expand
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TLDR
An inside look at the empirical performance of the DSM-5 PTSD criteria in a population exposed to a natural disaster, which suggests the need for replication in larger epidemiological samples. Expand
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