Considerations of Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

@article{Niedermeyer2000ConsiderationsON,
  title={Considerations of Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus},
  author={Ernst Niedermeyer and M{\'a}rcia Ribeiro},
  journal={Clinical EEG and Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={31},
  pages={192 - 195}
}
The original concepts of absence status (AS) and complex partial status (CPS) are critically reviewed. This review has been prompted by a modern concept of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), portrayed as a rather common condition occurring chiefly in the critically ill elderly with high morbidity and mortality. This new view is a striking departure from the original concepts of AS and CPS as rare protracted epileptic events occurring usually in temporarily confused but otherwise… 
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TLDR
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Nonconvulsive status epilepticus: clinical features and diagnostic challenges.
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  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Psychiatric clinics of North America
  • 2005
Estado epiléptico no convulsivo en adultos en coma
TLDR
Nonconvulsive seizures and episodes of nonconvulsive SE in patients with severe impairment of consciousness are frequent and, therefore, continuous EEG monitoring is an essential neurophysiologic tool in the evaluation of comatose subjects.
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References

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TLDR
The study indicates that complex partial status may be more common and the clinical expressions of absence status more variable than hitherto recognized.
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TLDR
The diagnosis and treatment of NCSE, particularly complex partial status epilepticus, merit similar emphasis and attention.
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TLDR
Ten patients with persistent neurologic deficits or death after well-documented NCSE in the form of complex partial status epilepticus (CPSE) are reported, finding poor outcomes identified included persistent (lasting at least 3 months) or permanent cognitive or memory loss (5 patients), cognitive orMemory loss plus motor and sensory dysfunction (3 patients, and death).
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Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is much more common than is generally appreciated and is certainly underdiagnosed, but its long-term effects are largely undetermined and remain controversial.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is hypothesized that the EEG seizure activity in these patients may have been generalized from an initial focus, and the clinical features of status in the remaining 12 patients were in some respects similar to those of the patients with complex partial status.
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ELEKTROENZEPHALOGRAMM BEI EPILEPTISCHEN DAMMERZUSTANDEN
TLDR
It is shown that it could possibly take years or even decades until the epileptic origin of repetitive twilight states was dis-covered and a appropriate therapy installed and it is a professional blunder to refrain from recording an EEG “in flagranti” in patients with twilight states or repetitive intellectual disorders of un-certain origin.
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