Conserving honey bees does not help wildlife

@article{Geldmann2018ConservingHB,
  title={Conserving honey bees does not help wildlife},
  author={J. Geldmann and J. P. Gonz{\'a}lez-Varo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={359},
  pages={392 - 393}
}
High densities of managed honey bees can harm populations of wild pollinators There is widespread concern about the global decline in pollinators and the associated loss of pollination services. This concern is understandable given the importance of pollinators for global food security; ∼75% of all globally important crops depend to some degree on pollination, and the additional yield due to pollination adds ∼9% to the global crop production (1). These services are delivered by a plethora of… Expand
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