• Corpus ID: 29977545

Consensus statement on negative pressure wound therapy (V.A.C. Therapy) for the management of diabetic foot wounds.

@article{Andros2006ConsensusSO,
  title={Consensus statement on negative pressure wound therapy (V.A.C. Therapy) for the management of diabetic foot wounds.},
  author={George J. Andros and David G. Armstrong and Christopher E. Attinger and Andrew J M Boulton and Robert G. Frykberg and Warren S. Joseph and Lawrence A. Lavery and Stephan Morbach and Jeffrey Niezgoda and Boulos Toursarkissian},
  journal={Ostomy/wound management},
  year={2006},
  volume={Suppl},
  pages={
          1-32
        }
}
UNLABELLED In 2004, a multidisciplinary expert panel convened at the Tucson Expert Consensus Conference (TECC) to determine appropriate use of negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by a Vacuum Assisted Closure device (V.A.C. THERAPY, KCI, San Antonio, Texas) in the treatment of diabetic foot wounds. These guidelines were updated by a second multidisciplinary expert panel at a consensus conference on the use of V.A.C. THERAPY, held in February 2006, in Miami, Florida. This updated version… 
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Efficacy of Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy versus Conventional Povidone Iodine Dressing in the Management of Diabetic Foot Ulcers : A Randomized Control Trial
Objective: To equate the effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure therapy (VACT) with conventional povidone iodine dressing (CTPID) in the management of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Methods: It was a
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References

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Vacuum-assisted closure versus saline-moistened gauze in the healing of postoperative diabetic foot wounds.
TLDR
This pilot study found that vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) therapy would afford quicker wound resolution as compared to saline-moistened gauze in the treatment of postoperative diabetic foot wounds.
Vacuum-Assisted Closure to Aid Wound Healing in Foot and Ankle Surgery
TLDR
VAC therapy is a useful adjunct to the standard treatment of chronic wound or ulcers in patients with diabetes or peripheral vascular disease and leads to a quicker wound closure and, in most patients, avoids the need for further surgery.
Negative pressure wound therapy after partial diabetic foot amputation: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial
TLDR
NPWT delivered by the VAC Therapy System seems to be a safe and effective treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds, and could lead to a higher proportion of healed wounds, faster healing rates, and potentially fewer re-amputations than standard care.
Experience with the Vacuum Assisted Closure Negative Pressure Technique in the Treatment of Non-healing Diabetic and Dysvascular Wounds
TLDR
The results indicate that the Vacuum Assisted Closure negative pressure technique is emerging as an acceptable option for wound care of the lower extremity; not all patients are candidates for such treatment; those patients with severe peripheral vascular disease or smaller forefoot wounds may be best treated by other modalities.
Vacuum‐Assisted Closure: A New Method for Wound Control and Treatment: Clinical Experience
TLDR
A new subatmospheric pressure technique is presented: vacuum-assisted closure, which removes chronic edema, leading to increased localized blood flow, and the applied forces result in the enhanced formation of granulation tissue.
A Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Negative-pressure Wound Dressings for Diabetic Foot Wounds
TLDR
Over the first several weeks of therapy, VAC dressings decreased wound depth and volume more effectively than moist gauze dressings, suggesting that negative-pressure wound treatment may accelerate closure of large foot wounds in the diabetic patient.
An economic evaluation of the use of TNP on full-thickness wounds.
TLDR
TNP had higher material costs, but these were compensated by the lower number of time-consuming dressing changes and the shorter duration until they were 'ready for surgical therapy', resulting in the therapy being equally as expensive as conventional moist gauze.
Outcomes of subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy on wounds of the diabetic foot.
TLDR
It is concluded that appropriate use of subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy to achieve a rapid granular bed in diabetic foot wounds may have promise in treatment of this population at high risk for amputation and that a large, randomized trial is now indicated.
Vacuum therapy as an intermediate phase in wound closure: a clinical experience
TLDR
V vacuum therapy seems to be benificial in complicated wounds with impaired wound healing, and a prospective randomized clinical trail, in which vacuum therapy is compared to conventional dressing, is in progress.
Effect of noncontact normothermic wound therapy on the healing of neuropathic (diabetic) foot ulcers: an interim analysis of 20 patients.
TLDR
This is the interim analysis of a prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing diabetic foot ulcer healing in patients being treated with either noncontact normothermic wound therapy (Warm-UP; Augustine Medical Inc.), or standard care (saline-moistened gauze applied once a day).
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