Consensus revisited: quantifying scientific agreement on climate change and climate expertise among Earth scientists 10 years later

@article{Myers2021ConsensusRQ,
  title={Consensus revisited: quantifying scientific agreement on climate change and climate expertise among Earth scientists 10 years later},
  author={Krista F Myers and Peter T. Doran and John Cook and John E. Kotcher and Teresa A. Myers},
  journal={Environmental Research Letters},
  year={2021},
  volume={16}
}
The scientific consensus on human-caused global warming has been a topic of intense interest in recent decades. This is in part due to the important role of public perception of expert consensus, which has downstream impacts on public opinion and support for mitigation policies. Numerous studies, using diverse methodologies and measures of climate expertise, have quantified the scientific consensus, finding between 90% and 100% agreement on human-caused global warming with multiple studies… 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Examining the Scientific Consensus on Climate Change
Fifty-two percent of Americans think most climate scientists agree that the Earth has been warming in recent years, and 47% think climate scientists agree (i.e., that there is a scientific consensus)
Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming
The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%–100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are
Expert credibility in climate change
TLDR
An extensive dataset of 1,372 climate researchers and their publication and citation data is used to show that 97–98% of the climate researchers most actively publishing in the field surveyed here support the tenets of ACC outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
Quantifying the consensus on anthropogenic global warming in the scientific literature
We analyze the evolution of the scientific consensus on anthropogenic global warming (AGW) in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, examining 11 944 climate abstracts from 1991‐2011 matching the
Quantifying the consensus on anthropogenic global warming in the scientific literature
We analyze the evolution of the scientific consensus on anthropogenic global warming (AGW) in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, examining 11 944 climate abstracts from 1991–2011 matching the
The climate change consensus extends beyond climate scientists
The existence of anthropogenic climate change remains a public controversy despite the consensus among climate scientists. The controversy may be fed by the existence of scientists from other
Scientists' views about attribution of global warming.
TLDR
It is found that, as thelevel of expertise in climate science grew, so too did the level of agreement on anthropogenic causation; 90% of respondents with more than 10 climate-related peer-reviewed publications explicitly agreed with anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) being the dominant driver of recent global warming.
About “scientific consensus on climate change”
I ’m writing this personal opinion about a “hot” topic: the Antropogenic Global Warming (AGW) consensus. In EPN 44/6, John Cook presents the conclusions of a paper by himself et al., published in
The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change as a Gateway Belief: Experimental Evidence
TLDR
It is found that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change.
The pivotal role of perceived scientific consensus in acceptance of science
Public concern about anthropogenic global warming has been declining despite the scientific consensus on the issue. It is still unknown whether experts’ consensus determines people’s beliefs, and it
...
...