Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

@article{Cook2016ConsensusOC,
  title={Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming},
  author={John Cook and Naomi Oreskes and Peter T. Doran and William R. L. Anderegg and Bart Verheggen and Edward W. Maibach and J. Stuart Carlton and Stephan Lewandowsky and Andrew G. Skuce and Sarah A. Green and D. A. Nuccitelli and Peter Jacobs and Mark I. Richardson and B{\"a}rbel Winkler and Rob Painting and Ken Rice},
  journal={Environmental Research Letters},
  year={2016},
  volume={11}
}
The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%–100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016… 
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