Consensus building during nest-site selection in honey bee swarms: the expiration of dissent

@article{Seeley2003ConsensusBD,
  title={Consensus building during nest-site selection in honey bee swarms: the expiration of dissent},
  author={Thomas D. Seeley},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={53},
  pages={417-424}
}
  • T. Seeley
  • Published 19 March 2003
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
This study addresses a question that lies at the heart of understanding how the scouts in a honey bee swarm achieve unanimity in their dances, and so reach agreement in their choice of a future nest site: what causes the scouts that perform dances for the non-chosen sites to stop dancing for these sites? One possibility is that a scout stops dancing for a non-chosen site only after she follows a lively dance for another site, such as the site that is ultimately chosen. This hypothesis is… 

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It is suggested that nest site selection in A. florea has similar elements to nest siteselection in the better-studied Apis mellifera, and the observation that many more locations are indicated by dances prior to lift off shows that there are fundamental differences between the two species.

Modeling and analysis of nest-site selection by honeybee swarms: the speed and accuracy trade-off

A model of nest-site selection in honeybees is developed and it is shown that the probability of choosing the best site is proportional to its quality, but that this proportionality depends on its quality relative to other discovered sites.

Nest site selection in the open-nesting honeybee Apis florea Benjamin P. OldroydRosalyn S. GloagNaïla Even •

It is suggested that nest site selection in A. florea has similar elements to nest siteselection in the better-studied Apis mellifera, and the observation that many more locations are indicated by dances prior to lift off shows that there are fundamental differences between the two species.

Stability of choice in the honey bee nest-site selection process.

Moving home: nest-site selection in the Red Dwarf honeybee (Apis florea)

The results suggest that two fundamental aspects of the behavior of A. mellifera scouts—the process of dance decay and the process of repeated nest site evaluation—do not occur in A. florea.

Moving without a purpose: an experimental study of swarm guidance in the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera

Testing experimentally whether directional consensus is necessary for the successful guidance of swarms of the Western honey bee Apis mellifera by forcing swarms into the air prior to the completion of the decision-making process shows that swarms were unable to guide themselves before reaching the pre-flight buzzing phase of the decided process, even when directional consensus was high.

A self organising network model of information gathering by the honey bee swarm

A cybernetic model of a self-organising information network is used to analyse the findings from the last 60 years published research on swarm behaviour to investigate how a viable system, the honey bee swarm, gathers meaningful information about potential new nest sites in its problematic environment.
...

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