Consensus, Disorder, and Ideology on the Supreme Court

@article{Edelman2012ConsensusDA,
  title={Consensus, Disorder, and Ideology on the Supreme Court},
  author={Paul H. Edelman and David E. Klein and Stefanie A. Lindquist},
  journal={Journal of Empirical Legal Studies},
  year={2012},
  volume={9},
  pages={129-148}
}
Ideological models are widely accepted as the basis for many academic studies of the Supreme Court because of their power in predicting the justices' decision‐making behavior. Not all votes are easily explained or well predicted by attitudes, however. Consensus in Supreme Court voting, particularly the extreme consensus of unanimity, has often puzzled Court observers who adhere to ideological accounts of judicial decision making. Are consensus and (ultimately) unanimity driven by extreme… Expand
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