Consensus, Conflict, and Partisanship in House Decision Making: A Bill-Level Examination of Committee and Floor Behavior

@article{Carson2010ConsensusCA,
  title={Consensus, Conflict, and Partisanship in House Decision Making: A Bill-Level Examination of Committee and Floor Behavior},
  author={Jamie L. Carson and Charles J. Finocchiaro and David W. Rohde},
  journal={Congress \& the Presidency},
  year={2010},
  volume={37},
  pages={231 - 253}
}
Although conflict and partisanship are deeply entrenched in the public's view of the U.S. Congress, political scientists have noted that consensus characterizes much of the legislative branch's operations. We build on an expanding literature that moves beyond a focus on roll call voting and explore individual bills as the unit of analysis in an attempt to obtain an accurate picture of the broader context in which House decision making occurs. Drawing on evidence spanning 24 years, we document… 
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