Congenital intestinal malrotation in adolescent and adult patients: a 12-year clinical and radiological survey

@inproceedings{Husberg2016CongenitalIM,
  title={Congenital intestinal malrotation in adolescent and adult patients: a 12-year clinical and radiological survey},
  author={Britt Husberg and Karin Salehi and Trevor Peters and Ulf Gunnarsson and Margareta Michanek and Agneta Nordenskj{\"o}ld and Karin Strig{\aa}rd},
  booktitle={SpringerPlus},
  year={2016}
}
  • Britt Husberg, Karin Salehi, +4 authors Karin Strigård
  • Published in SpringerPlus 2016
  • Medicine
  • Congenital intestinal malrotation is mainly detected in childhood and caused by incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestines providing the prerequisites for life-threatening volvulus of the midgut. The objective of this study was to evaluate a large cohort of adult patients with intestinal malrotation. Thirty-nine patients, 15–67 years, were diagnosed and admitted to a university setting with congenital intestinal malrotation 2002–2013. The patients were divided into three age groups for… CONTINUE READING

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