Congenital Thrombophilic States Associated with Venous Thrombosis: A Qualitative Overview and Proposed Classification System

@article{Crowther2003CongenitalTS,
  title={Congenital Thrombophilic States Associated with Venous Thrombosis: A Qualitative Overview and Proposed Classification System},
  author={Mark Andrew Crowther and John G Kelton},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={138},
  pages={128-134}
}
In the mid-19th century, Dr. Rudolph Karl Ludwig Virchow provided a conceptual approach for investigating and managing patients with thrombotic disorders. Virchow proposed that thrombotic disorders were associated with the triad of stasis, vascular injury, and hypercoagulability (1) and that abnormalities in this triad were found in patients with thrombosis. Over the next 100 years, the roles of stasis and vascular injury in the pathogenesis of thrombosis were studied extensively, leading to… Expand
Review of Thrombophilic States
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The most commonly acquired pediatric causes of hypercoaguablity are reviewed, including central venous lines (CVL), malignancy, infection, trauma, and immobilization, which remain the highest risk situations that predispose children to the development of clots. Expand
Should patients with venous thromboembolism be screened for thrombophilia?
  • J. Dalen
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of medicine
  • 2008
TLDR
Thrombophilia screening to prevent initial episodes of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is not indicated, except possibly in women with a family history of idiopathic VTE who are considering oral contraceptive therapy. Expand
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Deepened knowledge of all potential risk factors, as well as the clear understanding of their role in the pathophysiology of venous thrombosis, are both essential to help achieve a faster and more efficient diagnosis of this condition and a more effective prophylaxis of patients at higher risk and treatment of those with manifest disease. Expand
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In clinical practice, diagnosis of hereditary thrombophilia has little impact on the curative therapeutic approach in venous thromboembolic disease and adherence to French guidelines remains limited. Expand
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Suggestions for thromboprophylaxis in carriers of hereditaryThrombophilia according to current guidelines/evidence are made for the most challenging high-risk situations as well as for the prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome. Expand
AUSES OF THROMBOPHILIA eficiency of Naturally Occurring Coagulation nhibitors
n the mid-19th century, Virchow identified hypercoagulability as part of the triad leading to venous hrombosis, but the specific causes of hypercoagulability remained a mystery for another century.Expand
Primary thrombophilia in Mexico: a single tertiary referral hospital experience
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The MTHFR C677T polymorphism has a very high prevalence compared with the low prevalence of anticoagulant protein deficiency and factor V Leiden mutation in Mexicans. Expand
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The frequent finding of multiple risk factors in Budd–Chiari syndrome explains the rarity of the disease and justifies the implementation of a comprehensive thrombophilia screening. Expand
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