Conformational Spread as a Mechanism for Cooperativity in the Bacterial Flagellar Switch

@article{Bai2010ConformationalSA,
  title={Conformational Spread as a Mechanism for Cooperativity in the Bacterial Flagellar Switch},
  author={Fan Bai and Richard W. Branch and Dan V. Nicolau and Teuta Pilizota and Bradley C. Steel and Philip K. Maini and Richard M. Berry},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={327},
  pages={685 - 689}
}
Complex Cooperativity Cooperativity in multisubunit protein complexes is classically understood in terms of either a concerted model, in which all subunits switch conformation simultaneously, or a sequential model, in which a subunit switches conformation whenever a ligand binds. More recently, a “conformational spread” model has suggested that a conformational coupling between subunits and between subunit and ligand is probabilistic. Using high-resolution optical microscopy, Bai et al. (p. 685… Expand

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