Conditioned taste aversion and operant behaviour in rats: Effects of cocaine and a cocaine analogue (Win 35,428)

@article{Dmello1979ConditionedTA,
  title={Conditioned taste aversion and operant behaviour in rats: Effects of cocaine and a cocaine analogue (Win 35,428)},
  author={G. D. D'mello and David M. Goldberg and Steven R. Goldberg and I. P. Stolerman},
  journal={Neuropharmacology},
  year={1979},
  volume={18},
  pages={1009-1010}
}
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COMPARATIVE POTENCIES OF AMPHETAMINE, FENFLURAMINE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN TASTE AVERSION EXPERIMENTS IN RATS
TLDR
Aversive potency did not appear to be correlated with known neurochemical actions of the drugs or with behavioural stimulation, but appeared to be a central action which may have been linked to anorexigenic potency or time course of action.
Cocaine-induced conditioned taste aversions in rats
Some effects of cocaine and two cocaine analogs on schedule-controlled behavior of squirrel monkeys.
TLDR
The behavioral effects of two phenyltropane derivatives of coaine and two cocaine analogs were qualitatively similar to those of cocaine, but each was 3 to 10 times more potent than cocaine.