Conditioned Variation in Heart Rate During Static Breath-Holds in the Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

@article{Fahlman2020ConditionedVI,
  title={Conditioned Variation in Heart Rate During Static Breath-Holds in the Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)},
  author={Andreas Fahlman and Bruno Cozzi and Mercy Manley and Sandra Jabas and Marek Malik and Ashley M. Blawas and Vincent M. Janik},
  journal={Frontiers in Physiology},
  year={2020},
  volume={11}
}
Previous reports suggested the existence of direct somatic motor control over heart rate (fH) responses during diving in some marine mammals, as the result of a cognitive and/or learning process rather than being a reflexive response. This would be beneficial for O2 storage management, but would also allow ventilation-perfusion matching for selective gas exchange, where O2 and CO2 can be exchanged with minimal exchange of N2. Such a mechanism explains how air breathing marine vertebrates avoid… 

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