Conclusions: implications of the Liang Bua excavations for hominin evolution and biogeography.

@article{Morwood2009ConclusionsIO,
  title={Conclusions: implications of the Liang Bua excavations for hominin evolution and biogeography.},
  author={Michael J. Morwood and William L. Jungers},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={57 5},
  pages={
          640-8
        }
}

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Additional H. floresiensis remains excavated from the cave in 2004 are described, demonstrating that LB1 is not just an aberrant or pathological individual, but is representative of a long-term population that was present during the interval 95–74 to 12 thousand years ago.
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