Concerns, dispositions and behaviors of aggressive drivers: what do self-identified aggressive drivers believe about traffic safety?

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The purpose of this investigation was to identify beliefs, driving personality dispositions, and behaviors that distinguish self-defined aggressive drivers from non-aggressive drivers. METHOD Telephone surveys were used to identify self-reported aggressive drivers (n=305) who were compared to non-aggressive drivers (n=1,715) concerning their beliefs, driving behaviors, and self-described driving dispositions. RESULTS Aggressive drivers, compared to non-aggressive drivers, were less concerned about speeding, aggressive driving, and cell phone use while driving, yet were more likely to have had an encounter with another aggressive driver. They were also more likely to report that they had driven when they knew they had too much to drink, yet they felt less likely that they would be stopped by the police. CONCLUSION Aggressive drivers display many dispositions that define them as high risk drivers and public information/motivational campaigns alone will likely be ineffective with this group of drivers. Strategies that combine visible enforcement with widespread publicity campaigns appear to be necessary.

Cite this paper

@article{Beck2006ConcernsDA, title={Concerns, dispositions and behaviors of aggressive drivers: what do self-identified aggressive drivers believe about traffic safety?}, author={Kenneth H. Beck and Min Qi Wang and Mary Moser Mitchell}, journal={Journal of safety research}, year={2006}, volume={37 2}, pages={159-65} }