Concern for Group Reputation Increases Prosociality in Young Children

@article{Engelmann2018ConcernFG,
  title={Concern for Group Reputation Increases Prosociality in Young Children},
  author={Jan M. Engelmann and Esther Herrmann and Michael Tomasello},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={29},
  pages={181 - 190}
}
The motivation to build and maintain a positive personal reputation promotes prosocial behavior. But individuals also identify with their groups, and so it is possible that the desire to maintain or enhance group reputation may have similar effects. Here, we show that 5-year-old children actively invest in the reputation of their group by acting more generously when their group’s reputation is at stake. Children shared significantly more resources with fictitious other children not only when… 

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